FAQ >> Estrogen Dominance FAQ'S

Estrogen Dominance FAQ'S
Q. How is estrogen dominance defined?
Q. What causes estrogen dominance?
Q. Can a woman have symptoms of estrogen dominance even if her estrogen levels are low?
Q. How do I know if I am estrogen dominant?
Q. Can I be estrogen dominant even though I am in menopause or post menopausal?
Q. Should I have my hormones tested to determine if I am estrogen dominant?
Q. Is it better to have a hormone test from blood or saliva?
Q. How do I go about having my hormone levels checked?
Q. How important is a well functioning liver for healthy estrogen metabolism?
Q. Does being overweight play a role in estrogen dominance?
Q. Is there any type of diet that can help control estrogen dominance?
Q. Can estrogen dominance lead to vitamin/mineral deficiencies?
Q. What are Phytoestrogens and can they contribute to estrogen dominance?
Q. What are some examples of phytoestrogen?
Q. What are some examples of foods and herbs that have phytoestrogens?
Q. I thought phytoestrogens were supposed to be good for women and women’s fibrosis conditions?

Q. How is estrogen dominance defined?
A. Dr. John Lee coined the term “estrogen dominance,” which is described as a condition where a woman may have deficient, normal, or excessive estrogen but has little or no progesterone to balance its effects in the body.

Q. What causes estrogen dominance?
A. There are many factors that can lead to a hormonal imbalance; for example,
diet, stress, impaired liver function, environmental chemical toxicities, lack of exercise, nutritional deficiencies, hormone replacement therapy, and estrogen dominance.

Q. Can a woman have symptoms of estrogen dominance even if her estrogen levels are low?
A. Yes, this can occur if a woman is not producing progesterone.

Q. How do I know if I am estrogen dominant?
A. Symptoms of estrogens dominance vary from mild to severe. This includes a wide array of symptoms and may vary from person to person.
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Q. Can I be estrogen dominant even though I am in menopause or post menopausal?
A. Yes, even though a menopausal/postmenopausal woman may not be producing as much estrogen, she can still be exposed to xenoestrogens. Using Calcium D-Glucarate can be beneficial in eliminating unhealthy circulating estrogens. Additionally, progesterone production reduces at this time also which can cause an imbalance.

Q. Should I have my hormones tested to determine if I am estrogen dominant?
A. It is a good idea to have your hormone levels checked to determine the status of your estrogen levels, as well as testosterone and progesterone which can be out of balance, especially if there is excess circulating estrogen.

Q. Is it better to have a hormone test from blood or saliva?
A. According to Dr. Lee, protein-bound hormones (progesterone, testosterone, estrogen) are more soluble in the water component of the blood. While bound to protein in the blood, only a small percentage of the hormone is active. Therefore, a blood serum concentration of these hormones is not an accurate measure of active hormones in the body because such a test does not account for the larger amount of hormones on the red blood cell membranes which are fat soluble.
Some doctors prefer blood tests and combine that information with symptoms to develop their own interpretation of the results to determine his or her readings.

Q. How do I go about having my hormone levels checked?
A. You can ask your doctor about testing your hormone levels. If this is unsuccessful you can look in the yellow pages for a “Compounding Pharmacist” in your area. This type of pharmacist formulates bio-identical hormone products for doctors who help with natural hormone balancing and should be able to offer names of such physicians who can order this particular type of testing. You may also refer to these links for a referral of compounding pharmacies and naturopathic doctors in your area that may be able to help, as well.
www.pccarx.com/contact.asp
www.naturopathic.org
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Q. How important is a well functioning liver for healthy estrogen metabolism?
A. It is very important; the ovaries produce “raw” estrogen in the form of estradiol and estrone. It is the livers job to metabolize the raw estrogens into a safe form known as estriol, which our bodies utilize safely. If the liver is overburdened, then it has a hard time metabolizing these estrogens and they are re-circulated throughout the bloodstream and deposited in uterine and breast tissues as well at fat cells.

Q. Does being overweight play a role in estrogen dominance?
A. Yes, for reasons mentioned above. When “raw” estrogen is not metabolized properly, excess un-metabolized estrogen can be deposited and stored in fat cells.

Q. Is there any type of diet that can help control estrogen dominance?
A. Yes, you can help lower your estrogen levels by reducing excess calorie intake, avoiding sugars and refined carbohydrates, maintaining a high-fiber diet, and supplementing with high-fiber products such as rice bran. Drinking more than two cups of coffee per day has been shown to increase estrogen levels. Eliminating soy products and other phytoestrogens is also important so that you do not add any more estrogen to an already dominant body.

Q. Can estrogen dominance lead to vitamin/mineral deficiencies?
A. Excess estrogen can create nutrient deficiencies of zinc, magnesium, and all of the B Vitamins. Every one of these dietary nutrients is essential for the maintence of hormonal balance.

Q. What are Phytoestrogens and can they contribute to estrogen dominance?
A. Phytoestrogens (phyto meaning plant) are naturally occurring estrogenic compounds that are found in almost all varieties of foods, herbs, and spices. The chemical structure of phytoestrogens resembles estrogen. However, these compounds are considered weak estrogens when compared to real estrogen and xenoestrogens. It is important to remember that when the body is already estrogen dominant, adding estrogen of any type can increase this condition.

Q. What are some examples of phytoestrogen?
A. Some of the strongest phytoestrogen containing substances are soy, lignins in flax seeds, red clover, black cohosh, chaste berry, and dong quai. Soy includes soybeans, soy milk, protein bars, tofu, tempeh, textured vegetable protein, roasted soybeans, soy granules, miso, and edamame beans (raw soy beans).

Q. What are some examples of foods and herbs that have phytoestrogens?
A. Some of the strongest phytoestrogen containing substances are soy, lignins in flax seeds, red clover, black cohosh, chaste berry, and dong quai. Soy includes soybeans, soy milk, soy protein powders and bars, tofu, tempeh, textured vegetable protein, roasted soybeans, soy granules, miso, and edamame beans (raw soy beans).

Q. I thought phytoestrogens were supposed to be good for women and women’s fibrosis conditions?
A. You can consume plant foods (other than soy or flax) such as, leafy greens, legumes, and whole grains safely because they act as harmless, mild estrogens. Therefore, they compete against the stronger, more harmful estrogens for the body’s hormone receptor sites. Herbs and foods that are highly phytoestrogenic should only be used for short periods of time to correct an imbalance when fibroids are not present and estrogen dominance is not an issue. Long term use of such herbs can lead to increased estrogen levels.

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